[NEW] Mid-Season Invitational power rankings — old names come to play | mid season invitational 2018 – Vietnamnhanvan

mid season invitational 2018: นี่คือโพสต์ที่เกี่ยวข้องกับหัวข้อนี้

1. Kingzone DragonX

League: LCK

The 2018 Mid-Season Invitational marks the first time in the event’s history that South Korea is not represented by the LCK’s SK Telecom T1. Fortunately, the region’s reputation for dominance is in excellent hands with Kingzone DragonX. Of 44 total games, including the team’s finals series against the Afreeca Freecs, Kingzone only lost eight total — resulting in an impressive 82 percent winrate. Kingzone can attack opponents from any position including the jungle, where recent meta changes have allowed Han “Peanut” Wang-ho to run rampant over his opponents. Top laner Kim “Khan” Dong-ha has been quiet compared to last year and earlier this spring, but still draws enormous amounts of pressure and is impossible for opponents to ignore once he becomes a fixture in a sidelane. Gwak “Bdd” Bo-seong is steady in the mid lane and difficult to dislodge.

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Yet the true center of Kingzone is its bottom lane duo of AD Carry Kim “PraY” Jong-in and Kang “GorillA” Beom-hyeon. “Prayrilla,” as they’ve jokingly called themselves, is a partnership between legacy South Korean AD carry PraY, and one of the best supports in the region of all time in GorillA. The two knew each other from their NaJin days on the organization’s sister teams and first partnered together on the GE Tigers. PraY and GorillA are a fearsome duo that can play a variety of different styles depending on the meta. It’s PraY and GorillA’s stability — they’ve called themselves the “legs” of the team to hold it up — that allows the rest of Kingzone to split pressure as they please, be it through a Peanut invade or a 4-1 with Khan.

The blueprint for beating Kingzone is similar to the blueprint used by Samsung Galaxy at the World Championship last year to beat Longzhu Gaming: destabilize the bottom lane. However, in an AD carry-focused meta and with a significant upgrade in the jungle from Moon “Cuzz” Woo-chan to Peanut, this task is far more difficult than it was last year. Kingzone make few mistakes, easily punish the mistakes of its opponents, and always have the opportunity to come back in a game due to the individual talent on the lineup. It’s no surprise that Kingzone is a significant favorite to take the tournament.

2. Royal Never Give Up

League: LPL

When you think of Royal Never Give Up, your mind automatically goes to the legendary Chinese AD carry Jian “Uzi” Zi-Hao. Uzi has been the Chinese AD carry since the retirement of World Elite’s Gao “WeiXiao” Xue-Cheng, and has been an international fan favorite since his first League of Legends World Championship Finals appearance in 2013. His domestic results have often been at odds with international perception of his individual prowess, but this year, Uzi finally won his first LoL Pro League title in China after nearly four and a half years of trying. Now he goes to MSI to face a curated AD pool of the best from each major region.

Although Uzi is the headliner for obvious reasons, RNG’s playoff run — especially the team’s upset victory over Invictus Gaming in the semifinals and the 3-1 finals win over Ming “Clearlove” Kai’s EDward Gaming — was a team effort. Although he was used only once in the finals with an experimental composition that included Morgana mid, jungler Hung “Karsa” Hau-Hsuan’s synergy with the rest of the team has improved significantly since his initial arrival, especially with mid laner Li “Xiaohu” Yuan-Hao.

Since RNG have flexed well around both positions, the ability to take only one substitute hampers their game plan slightly. Jungler Liu “Mlxg” Shi-Yu has still been more coordinated with the team, despite Karsa’s improvement, and took iG by surprise with his early ganks in lieu of clearing camps. Meanwhile, they’ve been able to adapt how they spread pressure by flexing between Zz1tai and Letme. According to the lolesports website, Letme is going alongside both Karsa and Mlxg, so look for RNG to tweak their gameplan depending on which jungler starts.

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3. Team Liquid

Region: NA LCS

Yiliang “Doublelift” Peng will be joined by a cast of veterans at the Mid-Season Invitational. Provided by Riot Games

This MSI tournament is all about AD carries. PraY, Uzi, Martin “Rekkles” Larsson, and Yiliang “Doublelift” Peng have all been playing League of Legends since at least 2012. In the case of Doublelift, he was one of the first AD carries to become known internationally and like his 2018 MSI brethren, has continued to stay near or at the top of his position within his home region and internationally.

Yet, much like Uzi and Royal Never Give Up, Doublelift is the go-to name on Team Liquid, but the team’s improvements throughout the split and finals victory over 100 Thieves were coordinated team efforts. TL still like facilitating pushing lanes, and it prefers early advantages, but the team has evolved beyond the loose collection of strong laners that they were in the beginning of the 2018 North American League of Legends Championship Series Spring split. The finals featured strong performances from jungler Jake “Xmithie” Puchero and mid laner Eugene “Pobelter” Park, the latter of whom earned the finals MVP award. Liquid’s challenge at MSI will be to continue to improve on macro mistakes that they often make if it cannot garner early advantages in lane.

If possible, Team Liquid would be in a tier tied with Fnatic. Fnatic seem to have a stronger understanding of the map, but unfortunately will be missing starting top laner Paul “sOAZ” Boyer due to a hand injury. Few top laners draw and absorb pressure like sOAZ, which is why TL slid into the third-place spot on this ranking.

4. Fnatic

Region: EU LCS

Fnatic walks into the Mid-Season Invitational as a risen king, back on its throne in Europe, but salivating for conquest on a grander scale. Martin “Rekkles” Larsson is the knight that led Fnatic to great promise and will be the team’s player to watch come MSI. Among legendary AD carries, PraY, Uzi, and Doublelift, there is no better time to prove himself yet again. Europe was too easy. It gets real now.

Fnatic enjoyed relative dominance back home in Europe, having a fantastic heel in sOAZ up top, and a prestigious AD carry in Rekkles. Getting Rekkles to late game was an easy win condition when sOAZ could go into any matchup and soak up attention from the opposing team. Of course, Fnatic transitioned really well into winning with Gabriel “Bwipo” Rau up in the top lane, but he isn’t quite the same top laner at his current level. Fnatic loses out to TL in the power rankings partially due to its less competitive region, but also because there is more uncertainty without a player like sOAZ at an international event. Fnatic isn’t far behind though, it certainly has the stuff to usurp its Western counterpart and potentially even more.

5. Flash Wolves

Region: LMS

The champion of Taiwan is at fifth place, the last of the major regions, thanks to its poor performances abroad and extreme lack of competition back home. Gone are the days of the team that could challenge the best teams on its best day. Flash Wolves’ overall level isn’t far off from teams like Supermassive and Rainbow7, but it still has just a bit of macro know-how in favor of these teams. Still, Flash Wolves has to watch its back.

Flash Wolves sports a new look at this Mid-Season Invitational, having brought on two new players in Kim “Moojin” Moo-Jin and Su “Hanabi” Chia-Hsiang, in its fifth straight LMS title run. Moojin is no Karsa, but provides the basic muscle that Flash Wolves need to be relatively competitive internationally, while Hanabi profiles as a slight upgrade over Yu “MMD” Li-Hong. Two new additions, or not, Lu “Betty” Yu-Hung remains the team’s primary carry despite his disastrous performances at last year’s World Championship. His dominance of LMS bot lanes with star support, Hu “SwordArt” Shuo-Jie, doesn’t necessarily translate to the international level, but he has a spark to his play that was absent last year. He isn’t scared anymore and Flash Wolves are going to need a strong Betty to make it past the Play-In Stage, much less the Group Stage.

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Mid-Season Invitational Power Rankings

RankTeamLeagueRegion6.Supermassive EsportsTCLTurkey7.EVOS EsportsVCSVietnam8.Kabum!CBLOLBrazil9.Gambit EsportsLCLCommonwealth of Independent States10.Rainbow7LLNLatin America North11.Ascension GamingGPLSoutheast Asia12.Kaos Latin GamersCLSLatin South America13.Dire WolvesOPLOceania14.PentagramLJLJapan

[Update] 2018 Mid-Season Invitational Event Overview | mid season invitational 2018 – Vietnamnhanvan

Whether it’s your first time watching an international esports event or you just want a quick overview of what to expect at the 2018 Mid-Season Invitational, here’s your guide to the upcoming tournament:

What is the 2018 Mid-Season Invitational?

The 2018 Mid-Season Invitational (MSI) is an international League of Legends tournament. 14 regions will participate by sending their most recent split champion (Spring Split or Split 1) to face off against other regional champions in a fight for the title of ‘MSI Champion.’

This year MSI will be taking place in Europe (Berlin and Paris specifically). Previous Mid-Season Invitational tournaments have taken place in China, North America, and Brazil.

Who is playing at MSI 2018?

The teams, regions and corresponding leagues that will be competing at MSI 2018 are as follows:

  • CBLOL’s 

    KaBum

    ! e-Sports – Brazil (BR)

  • CLS’s 

    Kaos

     Latin Gamers – Latin America South (LAS)

  • EU LCS’s 

    Fnatic

     – Europe (EU)

  • GPL’s Ascension Gaming – Thailand, Southeast Asia Region (SEA)
  • LCK’s 

    Kingzone

     

    DragonX

     – Korea (KR)

  • LCL’s Gambit 

    Esports

     – Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)

  • LJL’s PENTAGRAM – Japan (JPN)
  • LLN’s 

    Rainbow7

     – Latin America North (LAN)

  • LMS’s Flash Wolves – Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau (LMS)
  • LPL’s (TBD) – China (CH) – Regional finals on 4/28
  • NA LCS’s Team Liquid – North America (NA)
  • OPL’s Dire Wolves – Oceania (OCE)
  • TCL’s 

    BAUSuperMassive

     – Turkey (TUR)

  • VCS’s EVOS 

    Esports

     – Vietnam (VN)

What are they playing for?

The title of MSI Champion and the corresponding trophy, medals, prize pool, and glory that comes with victory on the global stage.

25% of the total sales from the 2018 Conqueror skins will contribute to the MSI 2018 prize pool. Conqueror Varus and the 2018 Conqueror Ward will be available in the store from April 26, 2018 through May 20, 2018.

The total MSI prize pool will be made up of a base of $250,000, coupled with 25% of the total sale of Conqueror Varus and Ward skins, which is guaranteed to be at least $750,000, for a total prize pool of at least $1 million.    

Here’s how it’s broken down by team placement at MSI 2018:

  • Champion: 38.5%
  • 2nd

     Place: 19.5%

  • 3rd

    /

    4th

     Place: 9.75% each

  • 5th

    /

    6th

     Place: 5% each

  • 7th

    /

    8th

     Place: 2.5% each

  • 9th

    /

    10th

     Place: 1.5% each

  • 11th

    /

    12th

     Place: 1.25% each

  • 13th

    /

    14th

     Place: 1% each

In addition to prize pool, competing teams will also receive compensation based on sales of their in-game emotes. 30% of each MSI team emote purchased between May 1st, 2018 and May 20th, 2018 will go directly to that team.

As with last year, the results of MSI will impact where regions are seeded for the 2018 World Championship.

What’s the format of MSI 2018?

The tournament has three different phases:

  • Play-In Stage
  • Group Stage
  • Knockout Stage

Play-In Stage

The play-in stage takes place in Berlin at the EU LCS Studio starting on May 3. Ten teams will participate in the Play-In. Eight teams will play in Round 1, while the top two seeded teams, Flash Wolves from LMS and EVOS from VCS, will be automatically advanced to Round 2. The participating teams are as follows:

  • CBLOL’s 

    KaBum

    ! e-Sports – Brazil (BR)

  • CLS’s 

    Kaos

     Latin Gamers – Latin America South (LAS)

  • GPL’s Ascension Gaming – Thailand, Southeast Asia Region (SEA)
  • LCL’s Gambit 

    Esports

     – Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)

  • LJL’s PENTAGRAM – Japan (JPN)
  • LLN’s 

    Rainbow7

     – Latin America North (LAN)

  • LMS’s Flash Wolves – Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau (LMS)- Round 1 bye, starts in Round 2
  • OPL’s Dire Wolves – Oceania (OCE)
  • TCL’s 

    BAUSuperMassive

     – Turkey (TUR)

  • VCS’s EVOS 

    Esports

     – Vietnam (VN)- Round 1 bye, starts in Round 2

Group Stage

The group stage will also take place in Berlin at the EU LCS Studio starting on May 11. Two teams from the Play-In Stage will advance to take on the most recent champions from Europe, China, Korea, and North America. The format remains the same as last year, with the six teams competing in a Best of 1 double round robin, which means every team will play each other twice.

  • EU LCS’s 

    Fnatic

     – Europe (EU)

  • LCK’s 

    Kingzone

     

    DragonX

     – Korea (KR)

  • LPL’s (TBD) – China (CH) – Regional finals on 4/28
  • NA LCS’s Team Liquid – North America (NA)
  • Play-In Winner: Group A
  • Play-in Winner: Group B

Knockout Stage

The knockout stage takes place in Paris, France at the Zénith Paris – La Villette starting on May 18. As with last year, the top four teams from the Group Stage will advance to a Best of 5 bracket.

When is MSI happening? How can I watch?

Play-In Stage

  • Round 1 Dates: May 3 – May 6
  • Round 2 Dates: May 8 – May 9
  • Location: EU LCS Studio in Berlin

Group Stage

  • Dates: May 10- May 15
  • Location: EU LCS Studio in Berlin

Knockout Stage

  • Dates: May 18 – May 20
  • Location: 

    Zénith

     Paris – La 

    Villette

     in Paris, France

The MSI 2018 broadcast begins at the following times and will be streamed on Lolesports:

  • Play-in Stage Day 1: May 3, 1 PM CEST (4 AM PT)
  • Play-in Stage Day 2: May 4, 1 PM CEST (4 AM PT)
  • Play-in Stage Day 3: May 5, 11 AM CEST (2 AM PT)
  • Play-in Stage Day 4: May 6, 11 AM CEST (2 AM PT)
  • Play-in Stage Day 5: May 8, 1 PM CEST (4 AM PT)
  • Play-in Stage Day 6: May 9, 1 PM CEST (4 AM PT)
  • Group Stage Day 1: May 11, 11 AM CEST (2 AM PT)
  • Group Stage Day 2: May 12, 11 AM CEST (2 AM PT)
  • Group Stage Day 3: May 13, 11 AM CEST (2 AM PT)
  • Group Stage Day 4: May 14, 11 AM CEST (2 AM PT)
  • Group Stage Day 5: May 15, 11 AM CEST (2 AM PT)
  • Knockout Stage Day 1: May 18, 12 PM CEST (3 AM PT)
  • Knockout Stage Day 2: May 19, 12 PM CEST (3 AM PT)
  • Knockout Stage Day 3: May 20, 12 PM CEST (3 AM PT)

What are the rules for MSI 2018?

We’ve been working closely with all the regional leagues in advance of MSI 2018 to give them time to understand and comply with the ruleset. 

What’s happening in-game for MSI 2018?

Learn more about the in-game offerings and how you can support your region on the rift here.

Stay tuned to Lolesports to see who will Make History at MSI 2018. The battle begins with the opening match of the Play-In Stage on Thursday, May 3 at 4 AM PT.




The collective team behind the scenes at lolesports.


RNG vs. KZ | Finals Game 4 | Mid-Season Invitational | Royal Never Give Up vs. KING-ZONE (2018)


VOD of Royal Never Give Up vs. KINGZONE DragonX Game 4
2018 MidSeason Invitational Finals MSI2018
Royal Never Give Up Lineup:
Letme Top Ornn
Karsa Jungle Skarner
Xiaohu Mid Malzahar
Uzi ADC Kai’Sa
Ming Support Janna
KINGZONE DragonX Lineup:
Khan Top Illaoi
Peanut Jungle Olaf
Bdd Mid Vel’Koz
PraY ADC Xayah
GorillA Support Rakan
Watch all matches of the split here from all of our leagues: NA LCS, EU LCS, LCK, LPL. FULL VOD PLAYLIST https://www.youtube.com/user/LoLChamp…
You can always learn more and view the full match schedule at http://www.lolesports.com.
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RNG vs. KZ | Finals Game 4 | Mid-Season Invitational | Royal Never Give Up vs. KING-ZONE (2018)

2018 Mid-Season Invitational: Finals RNG vs. KZ


2018 MidSeason Invitational: Finals RNG vs. KZ MSI2018
Royal Never Give Up KingZone DragonX (Bo5)
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ติดตามข้อมูลข่าวสารต่างๆได้ที่
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2018 Mid-Season Invitational: Finals RNG vs. KZ

Group Stage Day 2 | Mid-Season Invitational (2018)


2018 MidSeason Invitational Group Stage MSI2018
KINGZONE DragonX vs. Fnatic
Royal Never Give Up vs. EVOS Esports
Team Liquid vs. Flash Wolves
EVOS Esports vs. KINGZONE DragonX
Flash Wolves vs. Royal Never Give Up
Fnatic vs. Team Liquid
Watch all matches of the split here from all of our leagues: NA LCS, EU LCS, LCK, LPL. FULL VOD PLAYLIST https://www.youtube.com/user/LoLChampSeries/playlists?view=50\u0026shelf_id=72\u0026sort=dd
You can always learn more and view the full match schedule at http://www.lolesports.com.
Join the conversation on Twitter, Follow us @lolesports :
http://www.twitter.com/lolesports
Like us on FACEBOOK for important updates:
http://www.facebook.com/lolesports
Find us on INSTAGRAM:
http://www.instagram.com/lolesports
Check out our photos on FLICKR:
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Group Stage Day 2 | Mid-Season Invitational (2018)

Rainbow7 vs Ascension Gaming | Mid-Season Invitational 2018 Play-In | R7 vs ASC


vod of R7 vs ASC MidSeason Invitational 2018: Play In Rainbow7 vs Ascension Gaming
Game Start: 07:47
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NALCS 2018 Spring Split Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJIIsW8PQINAU7ZcIGJhWkE6tmk0Bl3NH
EULCS 2018 Spring Split Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJIIsW8PQINC_a3FT6ZBcSu9wePmYzKG
LCK 2018 Spring Split Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJIIsW8PQINC3H8bAbWtSGnKKgnFrNHn

Rainbow7 vs Ascension Gaming | Mid-Season Invitational 2018 Play-In | R7 vs ASC

MSI 2018 | Login Screen – League of Legends (featuring Danger)


The official login screen for MSI 2018. Music: “2018 MidSeason Invitational Theme”
Composed by League of Legends Music Team
Additional Production by Danger
https://www.facebook.com/2emeDanger
Download available via SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/leagueoflegends/eyesonmsitheme2018

MSI 2018 | Login Screen - League of Legends (featuring Danger)

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