[NEW] Mushishi | mushi – Vietnamnhanvan

mushi: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

And within those habitats, the mushi themselves are creatively rendered as a strange mix of the familiar and the utterly alien. They are shapeless blobs propelled by twitching motions, phosphorescent insects scuttling along the earth, and great legless serpents twisting skyward. Some take the shape of a natural phenomenon, and the sight of a living rainbow exploding from the earth, or a long-restrained cloud breaking free, expanding and floating away, is bound to impress. The animation on the whole is excellent, but the mushi in particular seem to move with a vivid otherworldly fluidity. At least part of Mushishi is about making sense of the mysterious and bringing reason to something that seems unreasonable. The designs of the mushi add some believability to this; it’s quite easy to see how they could be thought of as ghosts, beasts, or legends, able to inspire both wonder and fear. The tranquility of the environments is consistently impressive in a low-key way, but the spectacle of the mushi can be eerie, majestic, and everything in between.

Sound is part of atmosphere, and in the same way that cold urban horrors might use reverberations in dark alleys or the foreboding thrumming of electronics, Mushishi uses a chorus of insects or the roar of drifting snow to surround us, allowing the setting to speak its piece. The music is minimal but startlingly effective, in many cases fitting easily alongside and even seeming to mimic the voices of the earth. Slow piano notes overlap with rhythmic footsteps, a woodwind’s sad screams resemble those of a forlorn bird. So, too, can the score sound almost unearthly, with an ominous progression of bells and chimes sometimes underscoring a haunting ending or signaling the arrival of the mushi. The result is an immersive ambiance where visuals and sound alone can convey dark, brooding tension or innocent curiosity with equal ease. It isn’t just pretty, it’s totally engrossing, exuding pure atmospheric mastery in almost every scene.

Through this vast world walks Ginko, revenant of revenants, our looking glass. Perceptive of the nature of human and mushi alike, he uses words as careful and deliberate as his journeying stride to become the voice of reason and, with an air of serene confidence, impart his knowledge to others. To become a witness to needless death, a bearer of bad news, or a participant in deception is sometimes part of his job description. As an admirer of life and truth, he cares for none of these tasks, but he’ll defy his own nature and undertake them with solemn dedication if he feels that it’s necessary. He is wise, but not infallibly so. Nor is he a complete stoic; outbursts of childlike wonder at incredible sights, sarcastic retorts to smart-mouthed travelers, and emotion-laden shouts of panic and warning to his fellow humans all show him as a little more than just the nonchalant white-haired sage. His development, in the traditional sense, is sparse, but he is afforded a poignant backstory that makes him and his thought process a little less of an enigma.

Of course, Mushishi gently pushes a picture of a sprawling and intricate world where all beings affect each other in ways both seen and unseen, their actions rippling outward in ever-widening circles, and in that sense, Ginko as a character is no different than any other living thing in the show, simultaneously of little and great consequence. He may be our guide, cursed and blessed to ceaselessly wander, but the world doesn’t turn for him. Rather, it’s in what he represents that we might find significance: The quest for knowledge, the insatiable desire to understand even while knowing that the sheer body of things in existence prevents total understanding. The need to capture the meaning of what surrounds us, spread our wisdom responsibly, and use it to form calculated reactions to the world instead of rash judgments. He truly is that silver fish swimming endlessly through dark water, opalescent barbels probing fathomless black crevices, illuminating them, if only for a brief moment. Much of Mushishi’s strength lies in the ability to provoke thought without direct questions, to let an image serve as subtext, and Ginko himself represents an impressively seamless merging of humanity and idea.

Mushishi is episodic, not bound by an overarching plot. It is a series of self-contained stories which vary in theme, but are always skillfully crafted. Most episodes consist of human drama, based on relatable and familiar emotions, infused with an element of the natural world. The episodic format delivers powerful and gripping tales in an extremely brief timetable, a feat which I have no problem appreciating. The scenarios are original, and the writing is rich with little subtleties and metaphors, but each episode can be understood and appreciated as successful story even if you’ve no desire to peer into them deeply. View Mushishi as a progression of intelligent parables full of interesting ideas, or as a bunch of moving and affecting tales; much to its credit, it is both.

Part of what makes Mushishi work is its steadfast refusal to portray anything in terms as simple as “good” or “evil.” Stories where barbaric man stupidly abuses mother nature, or where nature is a hate-filled monster that comes from the hills to eat scared little man, are a dime a dozen, and while they might pass as entertainment, they often fail to say anything worth saying because they handle man and earth as if they’re combatants in a holy war. Mushishi is not so black and white, and it has an idea that scales much better. The mushi are not red-toothed animals seeking to kill in droves. The humans are not greedy savages bent on scorching the earth. Both are just beings, trying to survive in the same place and at the same time. That they will cross paths, have conflicting interests, use each other, and hurt each other is inevitable; such is survival. Each episode is one meeting of mushi and human, one miniscule butting of heads in a massive world, with the implication being that this is simply what happens, everywhere. Instead of vilifying humans or portraying nature as a vengeful power, Mushishi whispers: This is just the way things are. It does give us a small shove by implying that, as the ones with the ability to reason and understand, the responsibility for mitigating the damage that humans inflict (and the damage that humans receive) falls on the humans, but it never degenerates into the preachy heavy-handedness or gross oversimplifications that plague many works with similar themes.

It’s that theme which allows Mushishi to navigate the spectrum of human emotion. Conflict in its world does not arise from moral failings or piggish greed, only from a lack of understanding, and understanding is a sword with many edges. Ask the child who learns of death, or the old man who learns of life. Sometimes the knowledge you gain is liberating, sometimes it’s disheartening, sometimes it’s terrifying. Mushishi can be all of those words and more, but even when it strays to one extreme, it never loses its humanity, its worldliness, or its feeling of being completely natural. Just as it can depict the warm orange rays of the sun and the cold white howl of the snow, it can depict innocent wonder and violent loss, and with equal sincerity. It has balance, and then some.

As a caveat, I will say that this is the kind of series that practically begs me to use the phrase “not for everyone.” It’s dialogue-heavy, more about the thought leading up to action than the action itself; it keeps the big guns of its visual spectacle on a tight leash, letting them explode only after a suitable buildup to assure the maximum payoff; it doesn’t have the conventional storytelling satisfaction of explicitly coming full circle, instead simply tapering off and fading quietly, as episodic series sometimes do. A few episodes will likely be enough to inform you of whether or not it’s to your tastes, and I’ve no doubt that many have labeled (and will continue to label) it as simply “boring.” I understand the origin of this opinion, but I cannot share it. Mushishi is strangely beautiful and intensely fascinating on several levels. Imbibe it a little at a time like liquor, or dive deeply into it and become drunk on its atmosphere, intrigue, and insights. In my experience, neither disappoints.

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palette is richly varied, reaching from the brilliant emerald of vegetation to the deep turquoise of the sea to the dusky red of a far-off sunset. Lighting is used to strong effect, whether it’s beams of sun streaming through layers of foliage and mist or a candle’s flame struggling to brighten a dark old house.And within those habitats, the mushi themselves are creatively rendered as a strange mix of the familiar and the utterly alien. They are shapeless blobs propelled by twitching motions, phosphorescent insects scuttling along the earth, and great legless serpents twisting skyward. Some take the shape of a natural phenomenon, and the sight of a living rainbow exploding from the earth, or a long-restrained cloud breaking free, expanding and floating away, is bound to impress. The animation on the whole is excellent, but the mushi in particular seem to move with a vivid otherworldly fluidity. At least part of Mushishi is about making sense of the mysterious and bringing reason to something that seems unreasonable. The designs of the mushi add some believability to this; it’s quite easy to see how they could be thought of as ghosts, beasts, or legends, able to inspire both wonder and fear. The tranquility of the environments is consistently impressive in a low-key way, but the spectacle of the mushi can be eerie, majestic, and everything in between.Sound is part of atmosphere, and in the same way that cold urban horrors might use reverberations in dark alleys or the foreboding thrumming of electronics, Mushishi uses a chorus of insects or the roar of drifting snow to surround us, allowing the setting to speak its piece. The music is minimal but startlingly effective, in many cases fitting easily alongside and even seeming to mimic the voices of the earth. Slow piano notes overlap with rhythmic footsteps, a woodwind’s sad screams resemble those of a forlorn bird. So, too, can the score sound almost unearthly, with an ominous progression of bells and chimes sometimes underscoring a haunting ending or signaling the arrival of the mushi. The result is an immersive ambiance where visuals and sound alone can convey dark, brooding tension or innocent curiosity with equal ease. It isn’t just pretty, it’s totally engrossing, exuding pure atmospheric mastery in almost every scene.Through this vast world walks Ginko, revenant of revenants, our looking glass. Perceptive of the nature of human and mushi alike, he uses words as careful and deliberate as his journeying stride to become the voice of reason and, with an air of serene confidence, impart his knowledge to others. To become a witness to needless death, a bearer of bad news, or a participant in deception is sometimes part of his job description. As an admirer of life and truth, he cares for none of these tasks, but he’ll defy his own nature and undertake them with solemn dedication if he feels that it’s necessary. He is wise, but not infallibly so. Nor is he a complete stoic; outbursts of childlike wonder at incredible sights, sarcastic retorts to smart-mouthed travelers, and emotion-laden shouts of panic and warning to his fellow humans all show him as a little more than just the nonchalant white-haired sage. His development, in the traditional sense, is sparse, but he is afforded a poignant backstory that makes him and his thought process a little less of an enigma.Of course, Mushishi gently pushes a picture of a sprawling and intricate world where all beings affect each other in ways both seen and unseen, their actions rippling outward in ever-widening circles, and in that sense, Ginko as a character is no different than any other living thing in the show, simultaneously of little and great consequence. He may be our guide, cursed and blessed to ceaselessly wander, but the world doesn’t turn for him. Rather, it’s in what he represents that we might find significance: The quest for knowledge, the insatiable desire to understand even while knowing that the sheer body of things in existence prevents total understanding. The need to capture the meaning of what surrounds us, spread our wisdom responsibly, and use it to form calculated reactions to the world instead of rash judgments. He truly is that silver fish swimming endlessly through dark water, opalescent barbels probing fathomless black crevices, illuminating them, if only for a brief moment. Much of Mushishi’s strength lies in the ability to provoke thought without direct questions, to let an image serve as subtext, and Ginko himself represents an impressively seamless merging of humanity and idea.Mushishi is episodic, not bound by an overarching plot. It is a series of self-contained stories which vary in theme, but are always skillfully crafted. Most episodes consist of human drama, based on relatable and familiar emotions, infused with an element of the natural world. The episodic format delivers powerful and gripping tales in an extremely brief timetable, a feat which I have no problem appreciating. The scenarios are original, and the writing is rich with little subtleties and metaphors, but each episode can be understood and appreciated as successful story even if you’ve no desire to peer into them deeply. View Mushishi as a progression of intelligent parables full of interesting ideas, or as a bunch of moving and affecting tales; much to its credit, it is both.Part of what makes Mushishi work is its steadfast refusal to portray anything in terms as simple as “good” or “evil.” Stories where barbaric man stupidly abuses mother nature, or where nature is a hate-filled monster that comes from the hills to eat scared little man, are a dime a dozen, and while they might pass as entertainment, they often fail to say anything worth saying because they handle man and earth as if they’re combatants in a holy war. Mushishi is not so black and white, and it has an idea that scales much better. The mushi are not red-toothed animals seeking to kill in droves. The humans are not greedy savages bent on scorching the earth. Both are just beings, trying to survive in the same place and at the same time. That they will cross paths, have conflicting interests, use each other, and hurt each other is inevitable; such is survival. Each episode is one meeting of mushi and human, one miniscule butting of heads in a massive world, with the implication being that this is simply what happens, everywhere. Instead of vilifying humans or portraying nature as a vengeful power, Mushishi whispers: This is just the way things are. It does give us a small shove by implying that, as the ones with the ability to reason and understand, the responsibility for mitigating the damage that humans inflict (and the damage that humans receive) falls on the humans, but it never degenerates into the preachy heavy-handedness or gross oversimplifications that plague many works with similar themes.It’s that theme which allows Mushishi to navigate the spectrum of human emotion. Conflict in its world does not arise from moral failings or piggish greed, only from a lack of understanding, and understanding is a sword with many edges. Ask the child who learns of death, or the old man who learns of life. Sometimes the knowledge you gain is liberating, sometimes it’s disheartening, sometimes it’s terrifying. Mushishi can be all of those words and more, but even when it strays to one extreme, it never loses its humanity, its worldliness, or its feeling of being completely natural. Just as it can depict the warm orange rays of the sun and the cold white howl of the snow, it can depict innocent wonder and violent loss, and with equal sincerity. It has balance, and then some.As a caveat, I will say that this is the kind of series that practically begs me to use the phrase “not for everyone.” It’s dialogue-heavy, more about the thought leading up to action than the action itself; it keeps the big guns of its visual spectacle on a tight leash, letting them explode only after a suitable buildup to assure the maximum payoff; it doesn’t have the conventional storytelling satisfaction of explicitly coming full circle, instead simply tapering off and fading quietly, as episodic series sometimes do. A few episodes will likely be enough to inform you of whether or not it’s to your tastes, and I’ve no doubt that many have labeled (and will continue to label) it as simply “boring.” I understand the origin of this opinion, but I cannot share it. Mushishi is strangely beautiful and intensely fascinating on several levels. Imbibe it a little at a time like liquor, or dive deeply into it and become drunk on its atmosphere, intrigue, and insights. In my experience, neither disappoints.

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[Update] Vagina, Muschi, Mumu, Möse? Wie nennt man das weibliche Geschlechtsteil | mushi – Vietnamnhanvan

Vagina, Muschi, Mumu, Möse? Unserer Autorin gefallen all diese Wörter nicht so recht. Warum gibt es keinen alltagstauglichen Begriff für das weibliche Geschlechtsteil? Über eine linguistische Lücke.

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„Puller!“, schreit das Kind und zeigt mit dem Finger wild fuchtelnd auf den fremden Mann, der an der Ampel neben ihm steht. Eigentlich eher direkt auf sein Geschlechtsteil. „Puller!“ Eine große Freude. Für das Kind. „Ich auch Puller!“, ruft es, und die Mutter lächelt zustimmend.

„Auch Puller?“, fragt das Kind weiter und zeigt auf die Frau, die neben ihm auf ihrem Fahrrad sitzt. Die Fahrradfrau guckt die Straße hinunter, die Mutter drückt beim Lächeln die Eckzähne schon etwas mehr aufeinander, schüttelt dann den Kopf und versucht überhaupt nicht mitleidig auszusehen darüber, dass die Frau keinen Puller hat. So geht das seit ein paar Wochen. Der „Puller“ kam aus dem Kindergarten mit nach Hause. Für das andere Geschlecht allerdings gab es dort kein Wort. So kann das nicht weitergehen. „Wie nennt ihr das da untenrum?“ Das Internet ist voll mit Menschen, meist Müttern, die das fragen.

Für den Penis gibt es viel mehr Bezeichnungen

Das weibliche Geschlechtsorgan ist ein wenig so wie das Plastikding, das auf dem Warenband an der Kasse dafür sorgt, dass die Einkäufe nicht verwechselt werden: Es hat schlicht keinen richtigen Namen. Oder keinen, auf den sich die Menschen einigen können und wollen. Scheide, Vagina, Muschi, Pussy, Lustgrotte, Lulu. Jeder hat die Wahl. Doch keines dieser Wörter sitzt so fest im Sattel seiner Bedeutung wie der Schwanz, der Pimmel oder, wenn der Gesprächspartner unter sechs Jahren alt ist, Pipimann oder Puller.

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Für den Penis gibt es in der deutschen Umgangssprache viel mehr Bezeichnungen, die einem so leicht über die Lippen gehen wie etwa „Schnittblumen“ oder „Kartoffelpüree“. Bei der Vagina aber stockt die Sprache. Sie versagt, sie versiegt oder vielleicht bildet sie auch ab, was ist: die Unterrepräsentanz der Vagina in der deutschen Gesellschaft nämlich. Viel zu wenig kümmert man sich um ihr Wohlbefinden. Selbst die, die eine haben. Man könnte meinen, die Vagina sei vor allem ein Penis, der nicht da ist. Denn so lernen es Kinder, deren Eltern es an Vokabular fehlt.

„Könnt ihr mir ein paar Wörter nennen, die ich den beiden (Teenagern) alternativ zu ‚Pussy‘ anbieten kann, die man auch in der Öffentlichkeit leise sagen kann, ohne dass gleich jeder guckt?“

Auch in österreichischen Mütterforen wird deswegen verzweifelt nach einem „lieben“ Wort für die Scheide gesucht: „Könnt ihr mir ein paar Wörter nennen, die ich den beiden (Teenagern) alternativ zu ‚Pussy‘ anbieten kann, die nicht ordinär sind, die man auch in der Öffentlichkeit leise sagen kann, ohne dass gleich jeder guckt?“, fragt es auf einer Website ganz verhuscht. Und Frauenmagazine, Mädchenmagazine, Listenjournalisten, sie alle fragen das Gleiche: Wie nennt ihr das weibliche Geschlechtsteil? „Bei uns heißt’s Pullermann und Muschi oder Mumu. Ich mag diese Ausdrücke Penis und Scheide nicht. Und an dem Wort ‚Muschi‘ finde ich überhaupt nichts Vulgäres“, schreibt eine.

Doch im Gegensatz zu Scheide oder Schwanz wird Muschi als Schimpfwort benutzt. Da kann jetzt die Muschi-Mutter aus dem Forum finden, was sie will. Es steht auf einer Liste im Internet mit über elftausend Schimpfwörtern. Scheidet also aus. Auch wenn es relativ verbreitet ist in Berliner Kinderzimmern, von Eltern, die sich die Bedeutungshoheit nicht von ein paar Schulhof-Gangstern nehmen lassen wollen. Ich werde nicht zulassen, dass das Kind durch ein Schimpfwort auf die Welt kam.

Mumu klingt wie ein weinendes Kälbchen

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Sehr verbreitet bei Menschen, die auf öffentlichen Toiletten eher den Handföhn als das Papierhandtuch nutzen, ist die Bezeichnung Mumu. Die aber klingt, als habe man ein Kälbchen zwischen den Beinen, das kläglich weint.

In Bayern sagt man zum Geschlecht des Mädchens Bisi, die Schwaben sagen Schneckle. Und viele sagen, wer nicht Scheide sagen mag, sei verklemmt. Vielleicht ist man aber auch gar nicht verklemmt, vielleicht waren nur immer die Eltern komisch, die so taten, als wäre es überhaupt kein Problem, Scheide zu sagen. Voll normal, alle Frauen haben eine Scheide. Aber warum betonen sie diese Normalität dann so? Lehrer im Sexualkundeunterricht, die das Wort Scheide auch alle voll normal fanden, aber sich trotzdem plötzlich so anders verhielten. Alles total normal! Scheide! Scheide! Scheide! Wie unsexy dieses Wort ist.

Gustave Courbets Gemälde „Der Ursprung der Welt“ zeigt das Geschlecht einer anonymen Frau. Wie Maler und Modell sich wohl über das Motiv verständigt haben?

Gustave Courbets Gemälde „Der Ursprung der Welt“ zeigt das Geschlecht einer anonymen Frau. Wie Maler und Modell sich wohl über das Motiv verständigt haben?

Quelle: picture alliance / dpa/ Grand Palais

Doch es ist eigentlich erst die Paarung aus Scheide und Schniepel oder Pipimann, die wirklich skandalös ist. Warum haben Jungen ein lustiges Geschlechtsteil mit einem Smileygesicht und fröhlich winkenden Armen, während das Geschlechtsteil der Mädchen traurig in einem vergilbten Aufklärungsheftchen blättert – beziehungsweise mit einer Kuh oder Katze verwechselt wird? Eine Studie der FU Berlin Ende der Neunziger bekam heraus, dass sowohl Jungen wie auch Mädchen häufiger Namen für das männliche als für das weibliche Geschlechtsteil kennen und das Wissen über Namen für das weibliche Genital bei Jungen am geringsten verbreitet ist.

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Snoppen und Snippan heißt das Geschlechterpaar umgangssprachlich in Schweden. In Finnland sagt man für Jungs Pippeli oder Kikkeli und Pimpi oder Pimpero für die Mädchen. Kommt halt überall Pipi raus. Und das ist auch der Grund, warum Elternteile dazu tendieren, Koseworte zu nutzen, solange die Geschlechtsteile noch keine andere Funktion erfüllen sollen. „Unnötige Verniedlichungen. SO entsteht die Scham vor sich und seinem Körper!“ schreibt wiederum das Mütterforum, und man wünschte, es wäre so einfach.

Bei Vagina denkt man immer auch an Pilz und Apotheken

Vagina wäre kein schlechtes Wort. Aber sagt man Vagina, denkt man immer auch an Pilz, an Apotheken, an die Beschreibungen von in Joghurt getränkten Tampons. Sagt man dagegen Schwanz, denkt man an eine hübsch glänzenden Pferdeschweif, der beherzt die dicken Fliegen auf der Kruppe vertreibt. Man denkt an den Löwenschwanz, der über den Boden zuckt, vielleicht auch manchmal an den Rattenschwanz.

Eine Bekannte, die seit wenigen Jahren überhaupt erst ein weibliches Geschlechtsteil hat (das weiß Gott nicht günstig war!) sagt, sie bevorzuge für ihres das Wort „Möse“, denn es habe etwas Altbackenes, Uriges, Kräftiges.

Die Sexshopbesitzerin und Sprachwissenschaftlerin Dr. Laura Meritt hingegen bevorzugt das Wort Vulva. Sie arbeitet daran, dass in der Lehre überhaupt erst mal die gesamte Anatomie der Frau benannt wird, da gibt es nämlich Lücken. Und dann kommt noch dazu, dass auch Scheide ein nicht ganz richtig benutzter Begriff ist, bezeichnet er doch eigentlich nur den inneren Teil der ganzen Multifunktionsanlage da unten, den Teil zwischen Gebärmutter und Scheidenvorhof.

„Muschel“ sagt der Sohn einer Bekannten, weil er „Muschi“ falsch verstanden hat, und macht damit den besten Vorschlag für ein Kinderwort für Vagina. Perle! Venus! Die Muschel winkt zwar nicht fröhlich mit den Armen, aber sie weiß sich zu öffnen und zu schließen.

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One Piece Size Comparison (Post-Timeskip/Part2)


[One Piece Size Comparison (PostTimeskip)]This video will demonstrate One Piece Size Comparison (PostTimeskip).
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One Piece Size Comparison (Post-Timeskip/Part2)

JALJALA जलजला by Kulendra | Sunita | Basanta Thapa New Nepali Lok Dohori Song 2078 ft Prakash | Juna


JALJALA जलजला by Basanta Thapa | Kulendra BK | Sunita Budha New Nepali Lok Dohori Song 2078 ft Prakash Saput | Juna Sundas
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JALJALA जलजला by Kulendra | Sunita | Basanta Thapa New Nepali Lok Dohori Song 2078 ft Prakash | Juna

LAMLANBI-Derrick x Krypton Zero(OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO-Derrick \u0026 Eliza)


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STARRING:
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Eliza Chanam:
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A big thanks to all the team and supporter
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LAMLANBI-Derrick x Krypton Zero(OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO-Derrick \u0026 Eliza)

DIR EN GREY – 蟲-mushi- [eng sub] LIVE HD


This is a remake of my July 2019 translation. I translated the song from scratch and while most lines remain more or less the same, there are some small but significant changes. I also elaborate more in the annotations this time.
\”Mushi\” means \”bug\” or \”insect\” and is often connected to being weak and pathetic. Words like \”weakling\” or \”crybaby\” contain this word in Japanese (弱虫, 泣き虫 etc.).
The performance of this song was taken from their TOUR1617 FROM DEPRESSION TO ________ [mode of Kisou].
Translation by me.

Annotations:
\”And now I can’t see anything\” The wording of this line is actually a bit uncommon and therefore interesting. Instead of simply saying \”I can’t see anything\”, it kind of states the opposite and says \”I am unable to see everything\”; \”Everything is not visible to me\”.
\”That I’m unable to open up Is because of my weakness and my past\” Can also be read as the weakness and past being what can’t be opened up about.
\”My heart showed me the meaninglessness of trusting\” Or \”believing\”. In this context though, I believe \”trusting\” is most fitting.
\”The commonplace answers Turn living back into meaningless death\” \”Meaningless death\” is literally \”white death\”, a poetic expression for dying in vain.
\”The plain answers Immediately make my heart begin to break a second time And so it transforms\” These lines seem to have been added in this performance. The official lyrics instead contain the line \”To be born again\”. The word \”transform\” seems to be a leftover of this original line (\”To be born again\” contains the same word (変わる)). Also, \”plain answers\” as in direct, matteroffact answers.
\”My heart left behind the strength that lies in trusting\” This line can be understood in multiple ways. \”Left behind\” as in, it’s no longer with me. Or \”My heart left me the strength that lies in trusting\”, as in it’s the only thing I still have. In this song, the former seems more likely to me, as in a prior line it’s established that \”My heart showed me the meaninglessness of trusting\”. However, it could technically be read as either.
\”My own selfcentered heart killed me\” The reason this line changed from my initial translation is because I read up more on the word used. 私心 is usually read \”shishin\” and means selfishness, and I used to be under the impression that the meaning more or less completely changes when read \”watashigokoro\”, like in this song. I found out however, that this reading (more commonly \”watakushigokoro\”) can still refer to selfishness, but can also just point to one’s own, personal feelings. I wanted to include both meanings without stressing one over the other, so I opted for \”selfcentered heart\”. I also realized that if you were to simply translate this as \”selfishness\”, it could even refer to the selfishness of others.

I do not own Dir En Grey or any of their music or performances.
I translate for fun and wanted to share this translation.
Thank you for watching!

DIR EN GREY - 蟲-mushi- [eng sub] LIVE HD

TOPSON back to SEA Ranked – vs SEA Legend Mushi Ohaiyo Dota 2


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►TOPSON back to SEA Rank vs SEA Legend Mushi Ohaiyo Dota 2
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TOPSON back to SEA Ranked - vs SEA Legend Mushi Ohaiyo Dota 2

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูบทความเพิ่มเติมในหมวดหมู่Wiki

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