[Update] Asura – Mythological Hindu Lord Beings | asura – Vietnamnhanvan

asura: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

  • Asura in Japanese, 734
  • Asura
  • Asura statue at Chamundi Hills

  • Asura In Japanese, 734
  • Asura
  • Asura Statue At Chamundi Hills

What is an Asura?

Asuras are spirits found in Buddhist and Hindu cosmology. They are usually portrayed as power-hungry and lusty. Even the best of the Asura can be unpredictable and prone to mood swings, which makes them risky friends and dangerous enemies!

Characteristics

Physical Description

Asuras are sometimes classified as demons, and they have the appearance to match! Their skin is deep red or blue-green, and their hair is inky black. Four to six arms sprout from their bodies, as well as three heads, with faces pointing in opposite directions. They are fond of fine clothing: silk skirts with golden sashes and fringes, gold bands around their arms, bejeweled collars and elaborate helmets.

Personality

Although they are more powerful than humans, the Asura are the least powerful—and least noble—of the deities. Their low rank means that they are envious of the other gods and, at the same time, easily insulted if they are not praised for the powers that they do have.

Above all else, the Asura are moody and unpredictable. For example, when Sakra became ruler of the earth, the Asura celebrated his rise to power by drinking huge quantities of potent liquor. While they were drunk, Sakra ordered that they be removed from his presence, and when the Asura sobered up, they were so offended that they declared war against the new ruler.

Still, the Asura are not all bad. On one hand, they experience pleasure as deeply as negative emotions, which makes them highly romantic lovers and fun friends. Many Asura have poured their passionate emotions into religion as well, becoming loyal practitioners and even priests. They make sacrifices, perform cleansing rituals, build temples, and make holy pilgrimages with great enthusiasm.

Hindus have divided the Asura into two groups: the good adityas and the evil danavas. Hindu texts also explain that an Asura who practices good acts can reach the next level among the gods, transforming into a asura-deva.

Because of their volatile emotions, Buddhists consider the Asura to be one of the “four unhappy births,” meaning that being reincarnated as an Asura is as bad as being reincarnated as an animal.

Special Abilities

As gods—and highly individualist gods at that—the Asura’s powers are almost as unpredictable as their emotions. They are known for performing wondrous miracles as well as waging nasty battles. They can fly, shapeshift, cast spells and charms, turn wild animals into slaves, and much more.

Female Asura, known as Asuri, are especially famous for the charms they can work with plants. One legend explains that the Asuri created a plant which could cure leprosy, another that they created powerful love potions with herbs.

Famous Asura

Andhaka

One morning, Shiva (the Hindu creator god) was meditating on a mountaintop. His wife, Parvati, was in a playful mood, so she crept up behind Shiva and covered his eyes with her hand. Immediately, darkness fell over the world and Parvati’s hand began to sweat from the intensity of Shiva’s gaze. Her sweat fell onto the mountain, and a blind boy sprang from the earth. Parvati was horrified by the boy, but Shiva insisted that the child was their son and must be kept alive. They named the child Andhaka.

Days passed and Parvati wept over the hideous child she had produce. Then, a demon king approached Shiva and begged for a child, since he had none. Shiva was pleased by the demon’s humility, and he gave Andhaka to him to raise as his own. Accordingly, Andhaka learned all the ways of the demons and, when his foster-father died, inherited his kingdom.

But the inheritance didn’t go over smoothly. The demon king’s blood relatives rejected Andhaka, saying that he wasn’t a true member of the family, and drove him into a deep forest outside of his kingdom.

In the gloomy darkness of this forest, Andhaka struggled to come up with a way to regain his kingdom. At last, he decided he would call upon the god Brahma for help. He fasted for many days and nights, but Brahma was still aloof. At last, Andhaka was driven to desperation, and in the darkness of the forest, he began hacking at his own arms and legs, begging Brahma to notice him.

Brahma appeared to look upon the bloody Andhaka, and he was pleased by his devotion. He decided to grant Andhaka two gifts. The first gift was something Andhaka had longed for all his life—he asked for his blindness to be cured so that he could see. This was done, and Brahma could see the green trees that he had only ever known by the touch of fluttering leaves, could see the bright birds that he had only known by their songs. He was overjoyed! If this miracle was possible, everything else must be possible as well—so he asked Brahma for invincibility.

Brahma denied the request, telling Andhaka that all things that are born must die. However, he would allow Andhaka to choose the condition of his death, so the young king declared that he would only die if he lusted for a woman who had been like a mother to him. Brahma granted this.

Andhaka spent the next few years reclaiming his kingdom, conquering surrounding lands and part of the heavens, and growing wealthy. His name became known—and feared—all over the world, for he hadn’t forgotten the lessons the demon king had taught him. At last, he bragged to his minister that his success was complete. No one could match his strength, his majesty, his riches.

But—the minister replied—Andhaka didn’t possess a beautiful woman.

Soon after, Andhaka was riding through his kingdom with his army. He came to a beautiful mountain and decided to rest there, sending out some of his generals to scout for enemies. When the generals returned, they had a strange story to tell: they had found an old hermit meditating in a cave, and beside him was a dazzling woman.

Andhaka ordered them to bring the woman to him, but the hermit refused to let her go. When the generals reported this to Andhaka, he was enraged, and he decided to go fight the hermit himself. He expected an easy victory, but to his surprise, he was met by an army that he couldn’t defeat.

The fight went on for five hundred years, with other gods joining in to support the hermit. All the while, Andhaka thought he would win. He was, after all, invincible. What he didn’t know was that the beautiful woman he was fighting so hard to claim would be the death of him; she was his own mother, Parvati.

At last, the hermit, Shiva, and Andhaka met each other in battle. Shiva managed to stab Andhaka many times with his trident, but wherever the king’s blood fell, new copies of him sprang up. Shiva ordered his servant to drink the blood before it could fall, and in this way, he finally managed to kill Andhaka and finish the centuries-old war.

Bhasmasura

Bhasmasura was a religious zealot, incredibly devoted to the great Shiva. After years of worshipping Shiva, Bhasmasura decided that he wanted to meet the god and ask a gift from him. He performed a long penance, starving himself and having his servants whip him, until Shiva was pleased and descended from the heavens to hear his plea.

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Bhasmasura was awed by the presence of Shiva, but he didn’t forget the gift he wanted. He asked for a special power: whenever he held his hand to someone’s head, that person would burn up. Unusual as it was, Shiva granted his loyal follower this request.

But the exchange took a quick turn for the worst, when Parvati appeared to ask her husband, Shiva, a question. Instantly, Bhasmasura was consumed by desire for Parvati. He decided to put his new power to the test by trying to burn Shiva up, so that he could claim Parvati for himself.

Shiva dodged out of the way just in time, but Bhasmasura kept chasing him. Eventually, Shiva managed to run to Vishnu, and the two gods came up with a plan to defeat Bhasmasura.

When Bhasmasura caught up, he was encountered by a gorgeous woman, such a sensual beauty that he forgot all about Parvati. He asked this new beauty to marry him, and she said she would, but only if he could copy her exact movements in a dance. She swayed her hips, and Bhasmasura swayed his. She twined her hands together, and Bhasmasura did the same. After several minutes of hypnotic dancing, she put her hand on the top of her hand. Without a second’s hesitation, Bhasmasura did the same and burned to a crisp.

Then the beauty transformed back into Vishnu, Shiva came out from hiding, and the two gods had a laugh together.

Vritra

Vritra was the ruler of the bad Asura. While on earth, he took the form of a huge dragon and prevented major rivers from flowing. His presence caused droughts, suffering, and death all over India, until he was killed by the hero Indra with a thunderbolt made by the gods.

Cultural Representation

Origin

In its earliest form, the word “asura” was a title, like lord, that could be used to describe any noble person, from kings to priests to gods. Later, “asura” evolved to mean any divine being, good or bad, orderly or chaotic. In the Vedic-Samhita, Hindu’s most ancient text dating back to 1500 BCE, “asura” had these two meanings.

Later, “asura” began to develop an evil connotation, perhaps because Asuras were associated with newer religions, while Devas continued to be associated with Hindu tradition. The Purana and the Shiva Sutras, dating back to the 3 CE and 8CE, refer to Asura as a special category of gods, usually destructive and chaotic.

Eventually, the Buddhists picked up the Hindu Asura and incorporated it into their own cosmology. They described Asura as the lowest of the gods, ill-mannered and undesirable.

Modern Appearances

In addition to their place in the Hindu and Buddhist faiths, the Asura have also worked their way into modern day fiction. They are especially popular in video games, where their quick temper and six sword-wielding arms make them difficult opponents for the hero to overcome. Final Fantasy, The Elder Scrolls and Dungeon Fighter Online all feature Asuran characters. They also made an appearance in the popular sci-fi movie, Stargate Atlantis.

[Update] Asura: Tale Of The Vanquished | asura – Vietnamnhanvan

How to Define Dangerous Books

Sometimes the only force that can take you through tabductso the end of a book this bad is the sweet thought of revenge: of how you are so going to maul the author in your review once the book is done and dusted.

This is a book that is so painfully badly written (500+ pages of tripe!) that ordinarily it should not merit much thought, but the fact that it tells a story that so many would want to hear, and might believe too easily, makes it dangerous nevertheless, and w

How to Define Dangerous Books

Sometimes the only force that can take you through tabductso the end of a book this bad is the sweet thought of revenge: of how you are so going to maul the author in your review once the book is done and dusted.

This is a book that is so painfully badly written (500+ pages of tripe!) that ordinarily it should not merit much thought, but the fact that it tells a story that so many would want to hear, and might believe too easily, makes it dangerous nevertheless, and worth discrediting.

Also, the idea of giving voice to the victims, of inverting the historical bias of “history is written by the victors” is quite interesting. This was the reason I could not resist picking up the book.

Written through a distorted prism of historical victimization, this book is simplistic beyond imagination, is replete with misprisions, and makes no attempt either to capture the poetry of the original epic or show any sort of fidelity to its philosophy. Instead it mangles every aspect of it.

The author is clearly a Dravidian fanatic and tries every angle to work his fever-pitch hatred into the epic and its ‘historical atrocities’.

In effect, the author wants to fan the North-South Divide (the Aryan Vs Dravidian political flame) and the caste divide, and is extremely vitriolic in his language throughout. The hatred is obvious in every page.

The two main threads running through this atrocious and fanatical novel are:

The basic thesis is this:

India was originally ruled by the Asura kings and Tamil was their language and it was high culture and complete equality and what not – a la Mahabali’s paradise – celebrated through the Onam festival of Kerala – the book assumes that fable to be the default condition of India. In a classic nostalgic narrative, this Mahabali’s India is evoked throughout as the Golden Age of India. According to the author, then the ‘Aryan Invaders’, a bunch of uncouth barbarians came and overthrew the Asura kings (all due to their own lack of unity) and established an uncultured primitive society throughout India. Yes, the barbarians not only won every war but they conquered the whole of the sub-continent – and this is in spite of the fact that the Asuras were so advanced in technology that they even had flying chariots (the Pushpaka Vimana) and stuff. Go figure.

Then the main narrative takes over – Ravana, an ambitious youth, rebuilds some semblance of the original glory of the Asura’s and eventually starts capturing back the mainland from his base off it – in Sri Lanka. During one of his conquests, he fathers a girl child who was abandoned and then adopted by the king of Mithila – yep, Sita is Ravana’s daughter in this narrative – can’t have the good guy indulging in random abductions, can we?

Then Ravan watches with great sadness as Sita marries Rama later in life and decides one day that her life with Rama will never be really cool and abducts her – in her own best interests, mind you – because the Aryan society mistreats women and Ravana doesn’t want that for his daughter. So in keeping with the high moral principles of the Asuras, he kidnaps her and keeps her captive against her will – way to treat them equal, eh?

Rama launches an attack and as usual (but not before Lakshman disfigures and rapes Ravana’s sister, provoking the now pacifist Asura king), the lack of unity is the undoing of the Asuras – Ravana’s own brother plots to dethrone him.

Eventually Rama triumphs and then institutes the caste system, Sati system and every known evil – all dictated by the Brahmans. India degenerates into all sorts of chaos and loses her position as a moral force and a political force in the world. The dark ages descend and Rama was the initiator, Ravana was the last hope for the Tamils – the golden age was lost forever.

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Now the funny thing is that the whole novel is written at a time when the whole Aryan Invasion theory has been thrown out of the window, more or less. It was part of the ‘divide & rule’ policy and this author wants to bring back those heydays of old. It is politically motivated twisting of facts. There is hardly any justification for the inventions that the author has indulged himself in.

Facts:

1. Ravana’s father was Visravas – Ravana was an aryan himself in all likelihood. (+ He is known to have followed the Vedic rituals that are so derided in this book – and technically that was the criteria for Aryanhood, just as Vibhishan in this book does)

2. Ravana was a North Indian himself too, before traveling down south and capturing the kingdom that belonged to Kubera (who is himself supposed to be Ravana’s brother – an earlier wave then?). So if anything, he must have been one branch of the Aryan Invasion that spread across India (as per that theory)

3. Dark skin is not a characteristic of Non-Aryan, nor is white skin a characteristic of Aryan:

– Rama was himself dark-skinned.

– So was Krishna, later (and Arjuna, for good measure).

– So was Vishnu himself, the supposed god of the ‘white-skinned’ Aryan race (btw, Shivites Vs Vishnavites is another virulent theme of this book – Vishnu worshipers are shown as the uncouth Aryan stock while Shiva worshippers are the Dravidian stock, according to the author.)

4. Sita is Ravana’s daughter purely because she is dark-skinned? By that logic, Rama too could have been an Asura prince? What, if any, racial conflict is the Ramayana supposed to portray then?

5. Plenty of were fair skinned and hence cannot be a simplistic racial characterization.

6. Dravidians are not always dark-skinned – stereotypes are for idiots, surely?

7. Recent genetic studies have shown the racial stocks to be hopelessly intermingled throughout India and gives no evidence of any distinct racial divide between North and the South.

8. Except for the language, not much divides the so called Aryan and Dravidian culturally, genetically, religiously or historically. Even the linguistic divide shows the potential for being bridged as a common ancestor for proto-Tamil and Sanskrit is investigated.

9. One more thing, the book boasts of being ‘Ravanayana.’ The name ‘Ramayana’ is formed from ‘Rama’ and ‘ayana’, translating to “Rama’s Journey,” not “Rama’s Story.” Shows the level of knowledge that was brought into this ‘rewriting’ of Ravana’s (and his people’s) story.

A Note to the Readers

Dear Readers, the author is clearly misguided and the book is clearly a fanatic’s attempt to rekindle old hatreds. Please do not take it literally. Take it as an inventive, if extremely badly written, exercise in reversing the so called historical bias of victors, and leave it at that. It merits no historical discussion, and is definitely of no political relevance.

This book is a blatant attempt to fan anti-brahminism, North-Indian hatred, and basically blame every ill of society on this ‘historical injustice’. It does have a call for caste-solidarity, but even that is not a noble call, considering that it is and not that is being called to unite.

For me, the scary thing about this is that such sentiments are already high in many cities. So many North Indian friends of mine complain about the increasing xenophobia towards them in South India, even in metropolitan cities like Bangalore. Speaking in Hindi in Chennai is a sure fire way of being discriminated against. Similarly, the North Indian cities too are treating the South Indians in a derogatory manner and treating them as encroachers.

The stereotypes that are popular about ‘’, ‘’, ‘’, ‘’, ‘’, ‘’ etc., are all manifestations of this. Not to mention the crudeness of delusional movies like Chennai Express: Ayyo, Rama, what’s aappening?

This mutual alienation is very dangerous and could easily be the cause for major riots in our densely packed cities. This sort of fanatical historical narratives only add fuel to this fire and should not be encouraged.

Instead of banning books that ‘offend’ religious and racial sentiments, we should be more careful of such works which provoke those sentiments and tries to convert them into blind hatred. Those are the dangerous ones.

Links:


Come south, young man, but here be dragons


The Great North-South debate rages


Labels and stereotypes – Do the roots of racism lie in the stereotypes we create?

would be a nice corrective (as a modern, opposing conspiracy theory, but perhaps closer to the mark).

Sometimes the only force that can take you through tabductso the end of a book this bad is the sweet thought of revenge: of how you are so going to maul the author in your review once the book is done and dusted.This is a book that is so painfully badly written (500+ pages of tripe!) that ordinarily it should not merit much thought, but the fact that it tells a story that so many would want to hear, and might believe too easily, makes it dangerous nevertheless, and worth discrediting.Also, the idea of giving voice to the victims, of inverting the historical bias of “history is written by the victors” is quite interesting. This was the reason I could not resist picking up the book.Written through a distorted prism of historical victimization, this book is simplistic beyond imagination, is replete with misprisions, and makes no attempt either to capture the poetry of the original epic or show any sort of fidelity to its philosophy. Instead it mangles every aspect of it.The author is clearly a Dravidian fanatic and tries every angle to work his fever-pitch hatred into the epic and its ‘historical atrocities’.In effect, the author wants to fan the North-South Divide (the Aryan Vs Dravidian political flame) and the caste divide, and is extremely vitriolic in his language throughout. The hatred is obvious in every page.The two main threads running through this atrocious and fanatical novel are:India was originally ruled by the Asura kings and Tamil was their language and it was high culture and complete equality and what not – a la Mahabali’s paradise – celebrated through the Onam festival of Kerala – the book assumes that fable to be the default condition of India. In a classic nostalgic narrative, this Mahabali’s India is evoked throughout as the Golden Age of India. According to the author, then the ‘Aryan Invaders’, a bunch of uncouth barbarians came and overthrew the Asura kings (all due to their own lack of unity) and established an uncultured primitive society throughout India. Yes, the barbarians not only won every war but they conquered the whole of the sub-continent – and this is in spite of the fact that the Asuras were so advanced in technology that they even had flying chariots (the Pushpaka Vimana) and stuff. Go figure.Then the main narrative takes over – Ravana, an ambitious youth, rebuilds some semblance of the original glory of the Asura’s and eventually starts capturing back the mainland from his base off it – in Sri Lanka. During one of his conquests, he fathers a girl child who was abandoned and then adopted by the king of Mithila – yep, Sita is Ravana’s daughter in this narrative – can’t have the good guy indulging in random abductions, can we?Then Ravan watches with great sadness as Sita marries Rama later in life and decides one day that her life with Rama will never be really cool and abducts her – in her own best interests, mind you – because the Aryan society mistreats women and Ravana doesn’t want that for his daughter. So in keeping with the high moral principles of the Asuras, he kidnaps her and keeps her captive against her will – way to treat them equal, eh?Rama launches an attack and as usual (but not before Lakshman disfigures and rapes Ravana’s sister, provoking the now pacifist Asura king), the lack of unity is the undoing of the Asuras – Ravana’s own brother plots to dethrone him.Eventually Rama triumphs and then institutes the caste system, Sati system and every known evil – all dictated by the Brahmans. India degenerates into all sorts of chaos and loses her position as a moral force and a political force in the world. The dark ages descend and Rama was the initiator, Ravana was the last hope for the Tamils – the golden age was lost forever.Now the funny thing is that the whole novel is written at a time when the whole Aryan Invasion theory has been thrown out of the window, more or less. It was part of the ‘divide & rule’ policy and this author wants to bring back those heydays of old. It is politically motivated twisting of facts. There is hardly any justification for the inventions that the author has indulged himself in.1. Ravana’s father was Visravas – Ravana was an aryan himself in all likelihood. (+ He is known to have followed the Vedic rituals that are so derided in this book – and technically that was the criteria for Aryanhood, just as Vibhishan in this book does)2. Ravana was a North Indian himself too, before traveling down south and capturing the kingdom that belonged to Kubera (who is himself supposed to be Ravana’s brother – an earlier wave then?). So if anything, he must have been one branch of the Aryan Invasion that spread across India (as per that theory)3. Dark skin is not a characteristic of Non-Aryan, nor is white skin a characteristic of Aryan:- Rama was himself dark-skinned.- So was Krishna, later (and Arjuna, for good measure).- So was Vishnu himself, the supposed god of the ‘white-skinned’ Aryan race (btw, Shivites Vs Vishnavites is another virulent theme of this book – Vishnu worshipers are shown as the uncouth Aryan stock while Shiva worshippers are the Dravidian stock, according to the author.)4. Sita is Ravana’s daughter purely because she is dark-skinned? By that logic, Rama too could have been an Asura prince? What, if any, racial conflict is the Ramayana supposed to portray then?5. Plenty ofwere fair skinned and hence cannot be a simplistic racial characterization.6. Dravidians are not always dark-skinned – stereotypes are for idiots, surely?7. Recent genetic studies have shown the racial stocks to be hopelessly intermingled throughout India and gives no evidence of any distinct racial divide between North and the South.8. Except for the language, not much divides the so called Aryan and Dravidian culturally, genetically, religiously or historically. Even the linguistic divide shows the potential for being bridged as a common ancestor for proto-Tamil and Sanskrit is investigated.9. One more thing, the book boasts of being ‘Ravanayana.’ The name ‘Ramayana’ is formed from ‘Rama’ and ‘ayana’, translating to “Rama’s Journey,” not “Rama’s Story.” Shows the level of knowledge that was brought into this ‘rewriting’ of Ravana’s (and his people’s) story.Dear Readers, the author is clearly misguided and the book is clearly a fanatic’s attempt to rekindle old hatreds. Please do not take it literally. Take it as an inventive, if extremely badly written, exercise in reversing the so called historical bias of victors, and leave it at that. It merits no historical discussion, and is definitely of no political relevance.This book is a blatant attempt to fan anti-brahminism, North-Indian hatred, and basically blame every ill of society on this ‘historical injustice’. It does have a call for caste-solidarity, but even that is not a noble call, considering that it isand notthat is being called to unite.For me, the scary thing about this is that such sentiments are already high in many cities. So many North Indian friends of mine complain about the increasing xenophobia towards them in South India, even in metropolitan cities like Bangalore. Speaking in Hindi in Chennai is a sure fire way of being discriminated against. Similarly, the North Indian cities too are treating the South Indians in a derogatory manner and treating them as encroachers.The stereotypes that are popular about ‘’, ‘’, ‘’, ‘’, ‘’, ‘’ etc., are all manifestations of this.This mutual alienation is very dangerous and could easily be the cause for major riots in our densely packed cities. This sort of fanatical historical narratives only add fuel to this fire and should not be encouraged.Links:would be a nice corrective (as a modern, opposing conspiracy theory, but perhaps closer to the mark).

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[Asura] Hướng dẫn sử dụng thức thần SSR Asura-Atula Onmyoji – Shin Otaku TV


phân tích chiêu thức và ngự hồn thích hợp

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูความรู้เพิ่มเติมที่นี่

[Asura] Hướng dẫn sử dụng thức thần SSR Asura-Atula Onmyoji - Shin Otaku TV

Deadpool – All Bosses (With Cutscenes) 4K UHD 60FPS PC


A gameplay video showing all of the bosses from the Deadpool videogame for the PC in 4K60 UHD! Enjoy! 🙂
►►►►►Click Description for Boss List!◄◄◄◄◄
Don’t forget to hit that subscribe button! it really helps out alot! ^_^
Boss 1: Chance White \u0026 His Bodyguards 0:00
Boss 2: Arclight 3:48
Boss 3: Blockbuster 7:24
Boss 4: Pizza Delivery Guy? 12:44
Boss 5: Keg Machine 14:36
Boss 6: Arclight, Vertigo \u0026 Blockbuster 15:48
Final Boss: Sinister 17:59
Ending 22:01
Check out the game on Steam! ➤ no longer available on Steam
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➤➤➤Gameplay by CaleoGaming◄◄◄
(C) Copyrights \u0026 Credits goes out to their rightful owners.

Deadpool - All Bosses (With Cutscenes) 4K UHD 60FPS PC

Asura’s Wrath + DLC – All Bosses (With Cutscenes) 4K UHD 60FPS


A showcase of all the bosses from Asura’s Wrath in 4K UHD including nearly all the cutscenes of the entire game, put together into one big movie. Enjoy!
►►►►►Click Description for Boss List \u0026 Timestamps!◄◄◄◄◄
Don’t forget to hit that Subscribe Button it really helps out alot ^_^
The Traitor 0:00
Boss 1: Wyzen 4:02
Purpose 10:03
Boss 2: Wyzen 14:20
Boss 3: Vajra Wyzen 20:18
Boss 4: Yasha 32:15
Rebirth 40:45
Temple Invasion 48:18
Kalrow, You’re Next! 59:32
Chillin’ with Augus 1:09:53
Boss 5: Augus 1:12:37
Embodiment of Rage 1:26:00
Yasha’s Interference 1:38:34
Boss 6: Raging Asura 1:55:17
Boss 7: Deus 2:10:33
Boss 8: Deus (2) 2:25:13
Boss 9: Vlitra 2:42:49
Boss 10: Vlitra Core 2:53:49
True Ending 3:01:12
Boss 11: Chakravartin 3:05:25
Saving Asura 3:23:31
Boss 12: Yasha 3:32:26
The Final Battle 3:52:34
Final Boss: Chakravartin 4:04:14
Ending 4:27:43
DLC Boss: Ryu / Evil Ryu 4:35:46
DLC Boss: Akuma / Evil Akuma 4:45:48

Find me on Twitter! ➤ https://twitter.com/CaleoGaming
If you wish to Support/Donate ➤ https://streamlabs.com/caleogaming
Twitch ➤ https://www.twitch.tv/caleogaming
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AsurasWrath, Asura, Capcom,
➤➤➤Gameplay by CaleoGaming◄◄◄
(C) Copyrights \u0026 Credits goes out to their rightful owners.

Asura's Wrath + DLC - All Bosses (With Cutscenes) 4K UHD 60FPS

[Vietsub] Onmyoji | CG SSR A Tu La | SSR Asura | Phần Hạ_Thiên Vực


Chúc các bạn một ngày vui vẻ!!!
Cảm ơn các bạn đã ủng hộ video của mình nè! ^_^
Note: Các bạn nhớ xem hết đoạn cuối của video nhé!!! :))

[Vietsub] Onmyoji | CG SSR A Tu La | SSR Asura | Phần Hạ_Thiên Vực

Khu rừng của Miyori – Vietsub Full HD


Đây là sub tôi tự làm vì sở thích chứ không vì ai cả nhưng vẫn muốn chia sẽ với những ai muốn thưởng thức.
Bản dịch này tôi dịch hồi cuối năm nhất Đh nên vẫn còn chưa nghiêm túc lắm nhưng tôi vẫn giữ lại bản sub này không sửa.
Hy vọng các bạn, các anh chị sẽ thích bộ phim tuổi thơ này.
Mọi người muốn phim gì tuổi thơ mà chưa có sub thì để lại cmt nhé

Khu rừng của Miyori - Vietsub Full HD

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูวิธีอื่นๆWiki

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